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2018 Fall Hawk Watch Results

Thanks to all who participated in this annual event

Species/Group

1

2

3

4

5

6

Total

Turkey Vulture

8

24

7

69

4

12

124

Osprey

 

 

1

 

 

1

2

Northern Harrier

10

4

5

13

9

7

48

Sharp-shinned Hawk

6

1

1

2

 

2

12

Cooper’s Hawk

 

 

1

 

 

2

3

Bald Eagle

13

2

12

22

13

7

69

Swainson’s Hawk

 

 

1

(1)

 

1

3

Red-tailed Hawk

19

11

21

17

5

13

86

Broad-winged Hawk

 

 

1

 

 

1

2

Buteo sp.

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

American Kestrel

2

11

14

73

3

3

106

Merlin

1

2

6

1

6

5

21

Peregrine Falcon

 

1

 

 

1

1

3

Large falcon sp.

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

Total species

8

9

11

8

7

12

12

Total individuals

60

57

60

198

41

55

471

Fewer groups than in recent years were in the field, but a nice tally of birds was compiled nevertheless. Rainy weather plagued groups in the west until early afternoon and those in the east until even later. This weather kept raptor activity low.

The combined species list for the day was 155 species, including a few additional ones that were seen after groups split up.

 

Group 1 – Ward Christianson, Marlene Waldron, James Whitelaw

Winnipeg - Grosse Isle – Balmoral – Woodlands – West Shoal Lake – St. Ambroise – Winnipeg.

Highlights included 2 Eurasian Collared-Doves, 9 Great Egrets, a night-heron, the only Warbling Vireo of the day and a Harris’s Sparrow. Total 93 species.

 

Group 2 – Linda Pearn, Neil Butchard, Katharine Schulz

Winnipeg to southwest of Portage la Prairie – as far west as PR 242 and as far south as Rd. 48N.

They noted 2 adult and 4 juvenal Red-headed Woodpeckers. Their total of 24 Turkey Vultures beat their previous high by 6, but Red-tailed Hawks were lowest-ever at 11. Total 62 species.

 

Group 3 – Robert Parsons, Jo Swartz, Betsy Thorsteinson, Christian Artuso

Their route took them via Carman and Morden to the Pembina Valley and the Kaleida Marshes and back to Winnipeg via the Manitou area.

This group was the only one to record Wild Turkey. They also found Red-headed Woodpecker. The raptor tally of 11 species was high. Total 87 species.

 

Group 4 – Peter Taylor, Mohammad Tohidifar, Rudolf Koes

Beausejour – Brightstone – Lac du Bonnet – Pine Falls – Brokenhead River – Beausejour

As usual, this route produced the highest number of raptors, albeit not the highest variety. Turkey Vultures were below par (they did not start flying until late), but kestrels were high. They also recorded White-crowned and Harris’s Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco and Rusty Blackbird. Total 79 species.

 

Group 5 – Andy Courcelles, Gene Walz

Winnipeg – Oak Hammock Marsh – Hecla.

Andy and Gene noted four species of goose (Snow, Ross’s, Cackling and Canada), found about 400 Sandhill Cranes at Oak Hammock and they were the only ones to report Trumpeter Swan, American Black Duck, Tree Swallow, House Wren, Connecticut Warbler and Yellow-headed Blackbird. Total species 87.

 

Group 6 – John Weier, Garry Budyk, John Hays

Winnipeg to Delta and Lynch Point and back. Group 6 found the greatest number of raptor species, with 12.  Their highlight included 13 shorebird species (including Marbled Godwit, Red Kno, Sanderling and Baird’s Sandpiper), Horned Grebe, Ruddy Duck and California Gull. They also had the highest number of species in total, with 101.